Stir Fried Bean Sprouts

Stir Fried Bean Sprouts with Fish Cake

Looking for some variety to your veggie lineup? Stir Fried Bean Sprouts may be that easy-to-make dish that’ll anchor itself to the weekly dinner rotation. As with many stir-fry dishes, the principle of using high heat not only ensures much of the crunch in the fresh sprout is retained, the dish should hardly take any time to complete.

  • Corn or Vegetable Oil
  • 1 oz Fresh Ginger, julienned
  • 2 Cloves Fresh Minced Garlic
  • ½ lb Sun Xien Soy Bean Sprouts, rinsed & well drained
  • ¼ lb Snow Peas or Carrots, julienned
  • (optional) 2 oz Rice Wine, Sherry, or Cognac

Preheat a large pan on high heat. Once pan is hot, add a few tablespoons of oil to swish around the hot surface and follow with the fresh ginger to flavor the oil. 30 seconds later, add the minced garlic continuously stirring it in the oiled pan to keep it from scorching.

The instant the garlic shows any signs of turning a more golden color (and certainly before it scorches to blackness) add the drained bean sprouts. Follow this with snow peas or carrots. Stir and fold the vegetables in this hot pan for approximately a minute. Salt to taste.

Add a shotglass worth of water or any of the optional spirits mentioned and immediately cover with a tight-fitting lid. Lower the heat to a simmer setting and let the covered vegetables steam-cook for another minute.

When time is up, carefully plate and serve. Enjoy!

Serves 4.

There are so many ways to change and alter this recipe. Try it with

  • julienned 5-Spiced Tofu
  • julienned White Tofu
  • julienned fish cake (pictured above)
  • soy-marinated ground pork
  • deboned & shredded roast chicken
  • sliced & seared marinated beef

The key to incorporating the proteins is to cook it at the ginger-oil stage before the bean sprouts. Cook the raw meats thoroughly and set aside in a holding dish. Continue to stir-fry the vegetables as instructed. At the end of the steam-cooking stage when the cover is lifted, toss in the cooked meats, stir with the vegetables to incorporate and plate.

Hotpot

Hot Pot

Nearly every Asian country across the Pacific rim enjoys their form of hotpot; an opportunity to gather family and friends around a vessel of savory broth to steep a variety of morsels. The regional variations from China to Korea to Japan to Cambodia to Vietnam and all points in-between are almost as fascinating as the list of ingredients used.

A cherished communal dining experience for over a millennium, hotpot is the embodiment of “Variety is the Spice of Life” long before the phrase was coined. Your guests will take delight in the expanded variety of textures and flavors when you remember to add Sun Xien’s products to your next hotpot ingredient roster:

Soft Tofu
Soft Tofu cut to more manageable cubes will add a delicate variation.
Tofu Pouches
Tofu Pouches snipped in half provides an opportunity to soak up that delicious hotpot broth.
Fried Tofu
Fried Tofu with its firmer core can be sliced thick and offered as a variation to fishcakes.
Mung Bean Sprouts
Bean Sprouts added to the broth surface serves as an organic cover to slow evaporation while adding to the vegetable variety.

Never experienced hot pot? There are over 6 million videos of folks enjoying some variation of it on YouTube.

Fried Tofu

Fried Tofu

Those familiar with our packaged Fried Tofu already appreciate how a simple tofu texture can be transformed into something a bit more complex through deep frying. The nature of any packaged product of course cannot maintain the full crispness that occurs immediately out of the fryer. Thankfully, crisp Fried Tofu is easy to make.

Using Sun Xien Tofu ensures the best tasting results because of our soybean-rich process. A selection of firmness also provides a range of variations. First-timers may find Sun Xien’s Firm Tofu strikes a great balance of easy-handling in the fryer with a nice body and texture.

Fried Fresh Tofu

  • 14oz Sun Xien Firm Tofu
  • Corn or Vegetable Oil

Heat approxiately 1-2 inches of corn or vegetable oil in a heavy pot or fryer. The goal is to have enough oil to ensure the entire cut cube is submerged.

When oil reaches 350°F, carefully and slowly add Sun Xien Firm Tofu as a single, uncrowded layer. As the tofu cubes fry, shift or turn occasionally to keep them from sticking. Maintain the 350°F temperature throughout frying.

When tofu reaches a golden color as pictured in the dish, remove with a wire scoop and let the cubes drain on a wire mesh or paper towel.

From here, only the imagination will limit the types of coating or dipping sauces that can accompany crispy Fried Tofu.

Coating options:

  • Toasted Szechuan chiles
  • Pico de gallo
  • Grated Parmesan

Dipping sauce ideas:

  • Plum sauce
  • Hoisin sauce
  • Szechuan chili oil
  • Sweet sour sauce
  • Light Soy with minced jalapeño
  • Cilantro lime
  • Horseradish mayo
  • Peanut satay
  • Coconut curry